Neurobiology of dopamine receptors

Dopamine is an important neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain and periphery that is important in the actions of many clinically used drugs, as well as in some drugs of abuse. Damage of certain dopamine neurons can result in severe neurological problems (e.g., Parkinson's disease), and it has been hypothesized that schizophrenia may involve, in some unknown way, alterations of dopamine systems. Our laboratory is interested in the pharmacology of the dopamine neurotransmission, with specific emphasis on dopamine receptors. This laboratory is focused on the biochemical and molecular mechanisms involved in D1 dopamine receptor function.

While it has been known for several years that the two major pharmacological classes of dopamine receptors interact with each other functionally, the mechanistic bases for this is unclear (e.g., it may be molecular or cellular as shown in the attached scheme). One line of research, using biochemical, neurochemical, and molecular methods) is seeking to determine the mechanism(s) involved in such interactions. In addition, we have been studying the molecular architecture of D1 dopamine receptors and their ligands using computerized molecular modeling of D1 receptors based, in part, on quantitative structure activity studies with new dopamine agonists and antagonists. These studies have already led to a new drug named dihydrexidine that has been shown to be a useful tool for studying dopamine receptor function, as well as having potential clinical utility.

Dope?

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it hurts my head /// i would like it to make more sense /// i am all about the linear story /// bore me, hollywood